How to install a door from your garage to your house

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Well, it’s a good idea to install a door from your garage to your house and it also save your money. Installing a garage door is not so easy .You need to contact a professional to install your door but, if u know how to do it yourself then you can do and save your money. There are some tips given below for helping you out to install door:

Tip 1: Make sure the door parts are working:

If your garage door is opening slowly or making a lot of noise, the problem may not be your opener. So before you buy a new one, check for broken or wobbly rollers and brackets. But don’t replace the bottom roller bracket yourself—the cable attached to it is under extreme tension. You’ll need to call a pro. If you’re replacing the rollers, get nylon rollers. They operate quieter than steel rollers and cost only a few bucks more. Next, check the torsion spring (mounted on the header above the door opening) to see if it’s broken. When one breaks, you’ll see a gap in the coils. You’ll need a pro to replace a broken spring.

Tip 2: Check the door balance:

Make sure the door is balanced. Close the door and pull the emergency release cord (always close the door first so it can’t come crashing down!). Lift the door about halfway up and let go. The door shouldn’t move. If it slides up or down, the torsion spring needs to be adjusted (or maybe even replaced). Adjusting the torsion spring is dangerous, so don’t attempt it yourself (you could get seriously hurt). Call a pro to adjust it.

Tip 3: Choose the right opener:

When buying an opener, choose a 1/3 hp or 1/2 hp opener for a single garage door (1/3 hp can be hard to find at some home centers). Go with 1/2 hp for a double door and 3/4 hp for a door that has a wood or faux wood overlay (they can be heavy!). Openers have a set opening speed, so installing an opener with a higher horsepower won’t open your door any faster.

Openers are available with a chain drive, screw drive or belt drive. Chain drives (a long chain pulls the door open and closed) are the least expensive, but they’re loud. Screw drives (a long threaded rod drives a mechanism that opens and closes the door) are priced in the mid- range. They require the least maintenance, but they’re not as quiet as belt drives. Belt drives (a rubber belt opens and closes the door) are the quietest, making them the best choice if you have living space above the garage. They’re also the most expensive.

 Tip 4: Set the opener on a ladder for easier installation:

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to assemble the opener and mount the rail to the header bracket above the door. Then set the opener on a ladder where you’re going to install it. The ladder (usually an 8-footer) holds the opener in position while you measure for your lengths of angle iron. If necessary, put boards under the opener to raise it.

Have the door open when you install the opener (clamp locking pliers onto the roller track below a roller to keep the door from closing). It’s easier to align the opener with the center of the door when the door is open.

Tip 5: Buy heavy-duty angle iron:

Garage door openers come with everything you need for installation. But the mounting straps that are included are often so flimsy that you can bend them with your hands. So buy slotted angle iron at a hardware store. Cut it to size with a hacksaw.

Angle iron provides a stronger installation and reduces vibration, which helps extend the opener’s life span. In an unfinished garage, attach the angle iron directly to the face of a joist with 1-in. lag screws. For finished ceilings, attach angle iron along the bottom of a joist with 3-in. lag screws. Hang the opener using two more lengths of angle iron and nuts and bolts. Use lock washers or thread-locking adhesive to keep vibration from loosening the nuts.

Tip 6: Replace all the components:

Don’t be tempted to reuse the old photoelectric eyes and wall button (opener button). The new photo eyes and wall button are designed to work with your new opener.

If the wires that run from your opener to the photo eyes and to the wall button are exposed, replace them, too. Those wires have probably been in your garage for 10 years or more, and they may be nicked or worn. Newer openers are extremely sensitive and won’t work if a wire is damaged. It only takes about 15 minutes to run the new wire, so it’s time well spent. If the wires are protected inside the wall, you don’t need to run new wire.

Tip 8: Fine-tune the opening and closing force:

The opener’s instructions probably tell you to place a 2×4 on the floor under the center of the door, then close it. When the door contacts the wood, it should stop and then reverse. Proper closing force ensures that if something is in the door’s path, the door won’t crush it.

The locations of the opening and closing force adjustment screws vary. Our unit has two screws on the front. When adjusting the opening or closing force, turn the screw only about 1/8 in., then recheck the force.

If the door starts to open and then stops on its own, increase the opening force. Likewise, if it stops on its own while closing, increase the closing force. You might have to make several small adjustments to get the force exactly how it should be.

Tip 9: Use bulbs that handle vibration:

(Install tough bulbs) Use “rough service” bulbs and don’t exceed the wattage listed on the opener. Bulbs that are too hot can damage the opener.

Tip 10: Fix a reversing door:

The most common problem with garage door openers is the door reversing when it’s closing, even when there’s nothing obvious obscuring the photoelectric eyes. If your closing force is adjusted correctly, then the problem is almost always the photoelectric eyes. The eyes are very sensitive— even cobwebs can interfere with them. First make sure the eyes are still in alignment (some- thing may have knocked them out of whack). Then make sure the eyes are clean and the path between them is clear. Finally, look for loose wires in the eyes and the opener.

To be safe and lower risks, it is best to hire a professional garage door specialist.  The specialist can determine and address the problems of your garage door and propose a feasible solution.  Feel free to contact us any time for help.  Call Yuval at (215) 805-9209 or visit SecureGarages.com – don’t forget our Awesome Amazon Local Deal!  Garage adjustment, reconditioning + safety inspection. and for another $34 we will replace up to 8 rollers!  Mention Code: Secure4Sure10 to get another 10% off your order!

How to get your garage ready for the winter

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It’s that time of year again! Just when you were enjoying the warm weather, fall and winter decide to come along and spoil the fun. Time to put all those Halloween and fall decorations away and get ready for winter! One might ask what are the things that must be done to prepare for the holiday season? You’re in luck! We are here to help you prepare for the winter season. Below is a list of things you might want to consider when preparing your garage for this season. Hopefully this helps you to get ready and be prepared for Santa!
The first step is to clean up your whole garage. Take advantage of the weather before it gets too cold. Sort through everything in your garage, tossing items you don’t need and moving those that could be stored elsewhere. Once you’ve cleared the area, wash the floors and scrub the walls. This seems like a big task, but it will make your garage look more spacious and organized.
Part of your cleaning process should include some steps to prevent damage to the garage. Your floor will undergo damage through the season as your tires track snow, gravel, and salt chemicals.

Install a protective coating to give a fresh look and protect the floor.

After cleaning, look at the space and what you have decided to store. Be creative as you organize. You may need to buy new storage containers or install wall racks to keep things out of the way. If you have out of season items, consider storing them in containers on the ceiling.
• Rotating storage bins. As you get ready for decorating, find a place to put those storage bins so you have room and space available to move around in your garage.
• Move freezable fluids into the garage. If you have any fluids outside, move them into the garage. If those fluids are needed (such as gasoline for a kerosene heater), it would be extremely difficult to get them thawed out and ready for use when you need them the most.

• Sealing the gaps. Even when your garage door is shut, wind and snow can still come in through the gaps. Make sure those gaps are sealed nice and tightly to prevent your electronics from freezing overnight.
• Heaters. With how crazy the past winters have been, you may want to consider purchasing a space heater for the garage. A heater can help make the garage warmer and also keep the cars warm.
• Insulation. Another way to keep the garage nice and warm would to be hire a contractor (or you can do it yourself) and install insulation into the walls of your garage.
• Setting up a mudpuddle. If your garage is attached to the house, you should designate a specific place to place your shoes (and family members) so dirt and snow does not track in the house.
• Snow blowers and shovels. With winter being around the corner, not every snow plow will be available. It would be a wise decision to purchase a snowblower, or shovel, to help with the driveway and sidewalks around your house so you are able to get to work or other events on your agenda.
Follow these simple tips to make sure your garage is ready for the winter. With a little planning, you’ll have your garage clean and be able to store everything you need this season. If you have any tips for garage organization and maintenance, we would love to hear from you!

To be safe and lower risks, it is best to hire a professional garage door specialist.  The specialist can determine and address the problems of your garage door and propose a feasible solution.  Feel free to contact us any time for help.  Call Yuval at (215) 805-9209 or visit SecureGarages.com – don’t forget our Awesome Amazon Local Deal!  Garage adjustment, reconditioning + safety inspection. and for another $34 we will replace up to 8 rollers!  Mention Code: Secure4Sure10 to get another 10% off your order!

How to avoid scratching your car from your garage

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As most owners of a garage may know, getting your car in and out of it doesn’t always go according to plan. Unless you’re the proud owner of a swanky extra wide garage, the risk of bumping or scratching your vehicle is relatively high. Obviously, the longer one has owned and used their garage the less likely it is that accidents will occur, but while you’re settling in to a new way of parking, or if your garage is situated on a tricky slope or corner, it’s best to be extra vigilant about garage accidents. Read on to discover what the most common garage accidents are and how you can take step to avoid them – after all, parking your car in a secure garage can take £££s off your insurance premiums; you don’t want to undo all of those savings because you have to claim for body repairs!

Use your Garage

If you have a garage, use it! It is the best way to protect your car. There are many benefits of covered parking, including protection from hail storms that can come with costly deductibles. In the winter, parking in a garage keeps ice and snow off of your vehicle, getting you on the road quicker. Garage parking also keeps your vehicle out of direct sunlight, which over time, can fade the appearance of leather or other aspects of your interior. Parking outside of the elements is the number one way to avoid hail and prevent car dents caused by it.

Driving Into Your Garage Door

A common mistake that many people make – particularly those with an automatic garage door such as a roller, tracked or sectional – is driving into the garage door itself. Of course, those with single panelled, up & over garage doors are not spared of this; a common mistake here is driving into the garage door when pulling up to it. This is particularly troublesome when the garage is situated on a slope. The key to avoiding this accident is patience. If you are waiting to drive your car out of your garage and the door is slowly being opened by the garage door motor, try to relax and wait until the door is in the fully open position. To risk driving into it is to risk damage to both your car and the garage door – neither of which are likely to be inexpensive to fix. Adding some outdoor and indoor spotlights which are trained to come on when the garage is being used can help to illuminate the door and increase your chances of stopping in time.

Driving Into The Side Of Your Garage

When driving in and out of your garage – particularly if you tend to reverse in – taking your time and ensuring the car is going in straight can save a lot of hassle in the future. Even the most experienced of drivers, who have used their garage a thousand times can dent or scratch their vehicle whilst manoeuvring in or out of the space. Generally speaking, a narrow garage entrance, a large car, or a complicated angle can make this a very genuine hazard, but even if your garage is wide enough, it’s something to keep in mind. Paying attention and seeking assistance if you’re struggling are the best ways to avoid an accident like this. Ensuring that your mirrors are pointing in the right direction, and even installing a convex mirror within or just outside the garage can help you to see what’s happening. It’s also worth noting that it’s easy to open your car door onto the wall of the garage or onto something being stored there without thinking.

Closing The Door On Your Bonnet or Boot

If you have a manual garage door, then you’ll know how heavy they can be, even if they have strong opening mechanisms and springs to hold most of the weight. Closing your garage door onto your car, therefore, is clearly not a good idea and can cause an awful lot of damage. Automatic doors will stop when they feel resistance due to safety laws, but manual doors will exert weight and force when closed on a car bonnet, roof or boot, so caution should be used if your door tends to be slammed a lot! If your door is automatic, one good way to prevent it from touching your car at all is the photocell kit, which can be found in our garage door accessories section. The photocells are placed on either side of your garage opening, either just inside or just outside the frame. They transmit an invisible beam between them, and if this beam is broken, the garage door will stop moving downwards until it has been manually overridden. If you can place these photocells so that they’ll catch your vehicle at the correct height, then you won’t have to worry about dents.

Overcrowding Your Garage Space

Having too much stuff stored within the garage is something that most garage owners and users will be familiar with. Garages, whilst not being truly ‘livable’ rooms of the home, tend to become a dumping ground for anything which doesn’t fit, is no longer used, or simply ‘doesn’t go’ with the house. Having some garage clutter is obviously not a problem, but when the stuff overrides the space and you still want to put your car in there, you raise the risk of running something over, or damaging your car. Try to keep your garage area neat and tidy, or at least ensure objects are stacked in boxes or on shelves at the back of the space, in order to keep a safe, open space for your vehicle.

To be safe and lower risks, it is best to hire a professional garage door specialist.  The specialist can determine and address the problems of your garage door and propose a feasible solution.  Feel free to contact us any time for help.  Call Yuval at (215) 805-9209 or visit SecureGarages.com – don’t forget our Awesome Amazon Local Deal!  Garage adjustment, reconditioning + safety inspection. and for another $34 we will replace up to 8 rollers!  Mention Code: Secure4Sure10 to get another 10% off your order!