How to Properly Install a Garage Opener

Garage-Door-Installation

If your garage door is opening slowly or making a lot of noise, the problem may not be your opener. So before you buy a new one, check for broken or wobbly rollers and brackets. You’ll need to call a pro. If you’re replacing the rollers, get nylon rollers. They operate quieter than steel rollers and cost only a few bucks more. Next, check the torsion spring (mounted on the header above the door opening) to see if it’s broken. When one breaks, you’ll see a gap in the coils. You’ll need a pro to replace a broken spring.

Check the door balance

Make sure the door is balanced. Close the door and pull the emergency release cord (always close the door first so it can’t come crashing down!). Lift the door about halfway up and let go. The door shouldn’t move. If it slides up or down, the torsion spring needs to be adjusted (or maybe even replaced). Adjusting the torsion spring is dangerous, so don’t attempt it yourself (you could get seriously hurt). Call a pro to adjust it.

Choose the right opener

When buying an opener, choose a 1/3 hp or 1/2 hp opener for a single garage door (1/3 hp can be hard to find at some home centers). Go with 1/2 hp for a double door and 3/4 hp for a door that has a wood or faux wood overlay (they can be heavy!). Openers have a set opening speed, so installing an opener with a higher horsepower won’t open your door any faster.

Set the opener on a ladder for easier installation

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to assemble the opener and mount the rail to the header bracket above the door. Then set the opener on a ladder where you’re going to install it. The ladder (usually an 8-footer) holds the opener in position while you measure for your lengths of angle iron. If necessary, put boards under the opener to raise it.

Buy heavy-duty angle iron

Garage door openers come with everything you need for installation. But the mounting straps that are included are often so flimsy that you can bend them with your hands. So buy slotted angle iron at a hardware store. Cut it to size with a hacksaw.Angle iron provides a stronger installation and reduces vibration, which helps extend the opener’s life span. In an unfinished garage, attach the angle iron directly to the face of a joist with 1-in. lag screws. For finished ceilings, attach angle iron along the bottom of a joist with 3-in. lag screws. Hang the opener using two more lengths of angle iron and nuts and bolts. Use lock washers or thread-locking adhesive to keep vibration from loosening the nuts.

Replace all the components

If the wires that run from your opener to the photo eyes and to the wall button are exposed, replace them, too. Those wires have probably been in your garage for 10 years or more, and they may be nicked or worn. Newer openers are extremely sensitive and won’t work if a wire is damaged. It only takes about 15 minutes to run the new wire, so it’s time well spent. If the wires are protected inside the wall, you don’t need to run new wire.

 Check the door’s opening force

To check the opening force, rest your foot on the door handle near the floor and open the door using the remote control. When the door lifts against your foot, it should stop with very little pressure. If the door continues to open, adjust the force.

Fine-tune the opening and closing force

The opener’s instructions probably tell you to place a 2×4 on the floor under the center of the door, then close it. When the door contacts the wood, it should stop and then reverse. Proper closing force ensures that if something is in the door’s path, the door won’t crush it.The locations of the opening and closing force adjustment screws vary.

Use bulbs that handle vibration

Garage door openers vibrate, so you’ll need special light- bulbs that can handle it. Look for “rough service” or “garage door” on the label.

Fix a reversing door

The most common problem with garage door openers is the door reversing when it’s closing, even when there’s nothing obvious obscuring the photoelectric eyes. If your closing force is adjusted correctly, then the problem is almost always the photoelectric eyes. The eyes are very sensitive— even cobwebs can interfere with them. First make sure the eyes are still in alignment . Then make sure the eyes are clean and the path between them is clear. Finally, look for loose wires in the eyes and the opener.

To be safe and lower risks, it is best to hire a professional garage door specialist.  The specialist can determine and address the problems of your garage door and propose a feasible solution.  Feel free to contact us any time for help.  Call Yuval at (215) 805-9209 or visit SecureGarages.com – don’t forget our Awesome Amazon Local Deal!  Garage adjustment, reconditioning + safety inspection. and for another $34 we will replace up to 8 rollers!  Mention Code: Secure4Sure10 to get another 10% off your order!

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